Health Effects

Many people fear that non-ionising radiation – regardless of origin and intensity – is harmful to health. As of today, the diversity of scientific knowledge can be summarised as follows:

Non-ionising radiation can lead to the warming of the human tissue. Furthermore it is also proven that electrical currents induced by intense radiation in the body can cause dysfunctions of nerve and muscle cells. These acute effects are common in that they occur from a certain radiation intensity, and under short-term exposure. The emission limits of the International Commission for the Protection against non-ionising radiation (ICNIRP) are set in such a way that evidently harmful effects should not occur.

In the accessible environment, the emission limits are only achieved in exceptional cases, so that harmful effects from non-ionizing radiation are generally not expected. However, the evidence is on the increase that biological effects now occur even in low, non-ionizing radiation below the emission limits set, and that physiological changes in the metabolism of cells has been detected.

During experiments with animals, the distribution of the hormone melatonin was affected during the night. More and more people are also reporting sleep disorders, eye flicker, headaches and concentration weaknesses, which they trace back to electromagnetic fields. Statistical studies have shown that there is a confirmed suspicion that even with weak electromagnetic fields carcinogenic effects can take place. A group of experts from the US National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, confirm that after several years of evaluation of all investigation reports, that low-frequency electromagnetic fields can cause cancer, and therefore biological effects can also occur well below the emission limits set.

The overall findings and experiences attained now confirm that a health impact at low emission intensity is possible.

 

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